Memory Debugger Commands

You can also type help <command> for further details on each command in the MAME Debugger interface.

dasm – disassemble to the given file
find – search program memory, data memory, or I/O memory for data
dump – dump program memory, data memory, or I/O memory as text
save – save binary program, data, or I/O memory to the given file
load – load binary program memory, data memory, or I/O memory from the given file
map – map logical program, data, or I/O address to physical address and bank

dasm

dasm <filename>,<address>,<length>[,<opcodes>[,<cpu>]]

The dasm command disassembles program memory to the file specified in the <filename> parameter. <address> indicates the address of the start of disassembly, and <length> indicates how much memory to disassemble. The range <address> through <address>+<length>-1 inclusive will be output to the file. By default, the raw opcode data is output with each line. The optional <opcodes> parameter can be used to enable (1) or disable (0) this feature. Finally, you can disassemble code from another CPU by specifying the <cpu> parameter.

Examples:

dasm venture.asm,0,10000

Disassembles addresses 0-ffff in the current CPU, including raw opcode data, to the file ‘venture.asm’.

dasm harddriv.asm,3000,1000,0,2

Disassembles addresses 3000-3fff from CPU #2, with no raw opcode data, to the file ‘harddriv.asm’.

find

f[ind][{d|i}] <address>,<length>[,<data>[,…]]

The find/findd/findi commands search through memory for the specified sequence of data. ‘find’ will search program space memory, while ‘findd’ will search data space memory and ‘findi’ will search I/O space memory. <address> indicates the address to begin searching, and <length> indicates how much memory to search. <data> can either be a quoted string or a numeric value or expression or the wildcard character ‘?’. Strings by default imply a byte-sized search; non-string data is searched by default in the native word size of the CPU. To override the search size for non-strings, you can prefix the value with b. to force byte- sized search, w. for word-sized search, d. for dword-sized, and q. for qword-sized. Overrides are remembered, so if you want to search for a series of words, you need only to prefix the first value with a w. Note also that you can intermix sizes in order to perform more complex searches. The entire range <address> through <address>+<length>-1 inclusive will be searched for the sequence, and all occurrences will be displayed.

Examples:

find 0,10000,”HIGH SCORE”,0

Searches the address range 0-ffff in the current CPU for the string “HIGH SCORE” followed by a 0 byte.

findd 3000,1000,w.abcd,4567

Searches the data memory address range 3000-3fff for the word-sized value abcd followed by the word-sized value 4567.

find 0,8000,”AAR”,d.0,”BEN”,w.0

Searches the address range 0000-7fff for the string “AAR” followed by a dword-sized 0 followed by the string “BEN”, followed by a word-sized 0.

dump

dump[{d|i}] <filename>,<address>,<length>[,<size>[,<ascii>[,<cpu>]]]

The dump/dumpd/dumpi commands dump memory to the text file specified in the <filename> parameter.
‘dump’ will dump program space memory, while ‘dumpd’ will dump data space memory and ‘dumpi’ will dump I/O space memory.
<address> indicates the address of the start of dumping, and <length> indicates how much memory to dump. The range <address> through <address>+<length>-1 inclusive will be output to the file.
By default, the data will be output in byte format, unless the underlying address space is word/dword/qword-only. You can override this by specifying the <size> parameter, which can be used to group the data in 1, 2, 4 or 8-byte chunks.
The optional <ascii> parameter can be used to enable (1) or disable (0) the output of ASCII characters to the right of each line; by default, this is enabled.
Finally, you can dump memory from another CPU by specifying the <cpu> parameter.


Examples:

dump venture.dmp,0,10000

Dumps addresses 0-ffff in the current CPU in 1-byte chunks, including ASCII data, to the file ‘venture.dmp’.

dumpd harddriv.dmp,3000,1000,4,0,3

Dumps data memory addresses 3000-3fff from CPU #3 in 4-byte chunks, with no ASCII data, to the file ‘harddriv.dmp’.

save

save[{d|i}] <filename>,<address>,<length>[,<cpu>]

The save/saved/savei commands save raw memory to the binary file specified in the <filename> parameter.
‘save’ will save program space memory, while ‘saved’ will save data space memory and ‘savei’ will save I/O space memory.
<address> indicates the address of the start of saving, and <length> indicates how much memory to save. The range <address> through <address>+<length>-1 inclusive will be output to the file.
You can also save memory from another CPU by specifying the <cpu> parameter.


Examples:

save venture.bin,0,10000

Saves addresses 0-ffff in the current CPU to the binary file ‘venture.bin’.

saved harddriv.bin,3000,1000,3

Saves data memory addresses 3000-3fff from CPU #3 to the binary file ‘harddriv.bin’.

load

load[{d|i}] <filename>,<address>[,<length>,<cpu>]

The load/loadd/loadi commands load raw memory from the binary file specified in the <filename> parameter.
‘load’ will load program space memory, while ‘loadd’ will load data space memory and ‘loadi’ will load I/O space memory.
<address> indicates the address of the start of saving, and <length> indicates how much memory to load. The range <address> through <address>+<length>-1 inclusive will be read in from the file.
If you specify <length> = 0 or a length greater than the total length of the file it will load the entire contents of the file and no more.
You can also load memory from another CPU by specifying the <cpu> parameter.

NOTE: This will only actually write memory that is possible to overwrite in the Memory Window


Examples:

load venture.bin,0,10000

Loads addresses 0-ffff in the current CPU from the binary file ‘venture.bin’.

loadd harddriv.bin,3000,1000,3

Loads data memory addresses 3000-3fff from CPU #3 from the binary file ‘harddriv.bin’.

map

map[{d|i}] <address>

The map/mapd/mapi commands map a logical address in memory to the correct physical address, as well as specifying the bank.
‘map’ will map program space memory, while ‘mapd’ will map data space memory and ‘mapi’ will map I/O space memory.

Example:

map 152d0

Gives physical address and bank for logical address 152d0 in program memory